Category Archives: The Shrine of Death

Review of ‘The Shrine of Death’

The Hindu’s Literary Review supplement carried the first review of The Shrine of Death!

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Thrillers spun around Indian mythology are a dime a dozen. Pluck out whispered legends about temples or idols and weave them into tales of intrigue and you have a thriller in hand. In this saturated milieu, this book by Divya Kumar manages to stand a tad apart.

Generic title aside, The Shrine of Death does what many of the author’s competitors in the genre either fail to do or just don’t care to do. Divya Kumar pushes her research into the background and focuses instead on the characters, and not just her two protagonists.

She paints a world of journalists, art-mongers, academics and disillusioned IT professionals, and the grand descriptions of nature, architecture and warriors’ physique that usually define this genre give way to observed mannerisms, sensibilities and one-on-one interactions. Superlatives are kept to a minimum. It makes all the difference.

Working women curl up on the couch with their flatmates, swapping ghost stories during powercuts. An old woman going through emotional hell takes the trouble to check in on a troubled youngster. Cousins discuss bikes and careers, and exchange surreptitious glares when being scolded.

None of these moments is essential to the plot. But they do the job of keeping the reader invested — and better ensuring that the page will be turned — than any cliffhanger can. The story seems more real because the people and the situations are relatable, even with the occasional supernatural oddity thrown in.

That’s not to say that The Shrine of Death doesn’t deliver the usual dose of history: it’s just that every single page isn’t dripping with information overload. Kumar gives her readers plenty of space to rack their brains, to try and get ahead of the plot.

The plot revolves around an idol theft, and the hunt for a missing researcher who might have discovered something invaluable. Her colleague and old friend begin searching for her and the mystery soon widens enough to encompass the police and the CBI. Throughout The Shrine of Death, Kumar keeps her ambitions simple and delivers what she promises.

The Shrine of Death; Divya Kumar, Bloomsbury, ₹399

(The original article appeared here.)

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Why ‘The Shrine of Death’?

As the release date of my debut novel, the thriller ‘The Shrine of Death’ (published by Bloomsbury India in April) draws nearer, here is a look at the origin of its title…

When I began writing my book, I knew I wanted to set it in the world of idol theft. The Hindu was, at that time, doing a lot of coverage of the high-profile bust of Manhattan-based art dealer Subhash Kapoor’s international idol smuggling ring. My story very quickly evolved into a sort of prelude to that bust, a highly fictionalized account of the circumstances that lead to the Idol Wing, a small, specialized wing of the state’s CID – the only one of its kind in India – getting wind of Kapoor’s smuggling activities and his associates in Tamil Nadu.

As the characters fell into place, it developed into a story of greed and betrayal, of treachery and murder, of love and loyalty… And yet, yet something was missing. I was searching for something, a missing piece to complete the puzzle. I found it one breezy Chennai evening, at a talk about Chola temples by historian Pradeep Chakravarthy at Ashvita Bistro. Suddenly, in the middle of that pleasant gathering, I was transported to the ancient world of the Cholas, and of Pallipadais, crumbling old sepulchral shrines built centuries ago to worship great Chola kings and queens who had passed on.

I still remember the little shiver that ran down my spine as I heard him talk about them, these temples built over the graves of kings and queens who lived a thousand years ago. Temples that were then handed over to an ancient sect of ascetics who surrounded themselves with death, and smeared their bodies with the ash of cremation grounds. The grandeur of the Chola empire, the incredible art that was born of that time, and the stories of great patrons such as Queen Sembiyan Mahadevi… All of this was already a part of the story I wanted to tell, and now, I had found the final, missing piece: The Shrine of Death.

 

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Pre-order ‘The Shrine of Death’!

The pre-order link for my debut novel, ‘The Shrine of Death’ is up on Amazon.in! And it’s currently available at a 44 per cent discount, so do check it out 🙂

An April 2018 release from Bloomsbury India, ‘The Shrine of Death’ is a fast-paced thriller with a heady mix of crime, mystery, romance and the paranormal. Set in the murky of world of idol-theft, it takes you from Chennai’s newsrooms and universities to the sepulchral shrine of a Chola queen in the heartland of Tamil Nadu, and nothing and no one is what they seem…

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‘The Shrine of Death’ — coming April 2018

Here it is guys! A first look at my debut novel, a thriller, to be published by Bloomsbury India this April:

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“A beautiful, fiery young historian who discovered two priceless bronzes from the 10th century has disappeared without a trace …

Prabha Sinha, an IT professional in Chennai, is plunged into a murky world of idol theft, murder, and betrayal after she gets a mysterious phone call one night from her old friend Sneha Pillai. As she races to find answers before the people she loves get hurt, she seeks the help of Jai Vadehra, a troubled young man with a tragic past, and the gorgeous DSP Gerard Ratnaraj of the Idol Wing, CID, whom she can’t help but be drawn to. Their search takes them from Chennai’s newsrooms and universities to the abandoned sepulchral shrine of a Chola queen in the heartland of Tamil Nadu, and nothing, and no one, is as they seem …”

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